clusters along the countertop


words+images in between


burnedshoes:

Unknown photographer, ca. 1929, Portrait of Hermann Hesse
"Trees have long thoughts, long-breathing and restful, just as they have longer lives than ours. They are wiser than we are, as long as we do not listen to them. But when we have learned how to listen to trees, then the brevity and the quickness and the childlike hastiness of our thoughts achieve an incomparable joy. Whoever has learned how to listen to trees no longer wants to be a tree. He wants to be nothing except what he is. That is home. That is happiness."
― Hermann Hesse, Bäume. Betrachtungen und Gedichte 
» more photos of Hermann Hesse «  |  » more photos of famous people «

burnedshoes:

Unknown photographer, ca. 1929, Portrait of Hermann Hesse

"Trees have long thoughts, long-breathing and restful, just as they have longer lives than ours. They are wiser than we are, as long as we do not listen to them. But when we have learned how to listen to trees, then the brevity and the quickness and the childlike hastiness of our thoughts achieve an incomparable joy. Whoever has learned how to listen to trees no longer wants to be a tree. He wants to be nothing except what he is. That is home. That is happiness."

― Hermann Hesse, Bäume. Betrachtungen und Gedichte

» more photos of Hermann Hesse «  |  » more photos of famous people «

goddess-of-smut:

red-lipstick:

Euan Macleod (b. 1956, Christchurch, New Zealand) - Seated Figure Beneath Rocks, 2012    Paintings: Oil on Linen

same

goddess-of-smut:

red-lipstick:

Euan Macleod (b. 1956, Christchurch, New Zealand) - Seated Figure Beneath Rocks, 2012    Paintings: Oil on Linen

same

(Source: niagara-galleries.com.au)

bofransson:

Beneath the Red Apples
Edvard Munch - 1913-1915

bofransson:

Beneath the Red Apples

Edvard Munch - 1913-1915

cabinhome:

breathe 3
the color green

theimpossiblecool:

Miles. 
complexae:

" Art of Being Amber " NYLON August 2000 Photographer: Mark BorthwickModel: Amber Valletta 

complexae:

" Art of Being Amber " 
NYLON August 2000 
Photographer: Mark Borthwick
Model: Amber Valletta 

europeansculpture:

Jean Arp - Torso, 1958

europeansculpture:

Jean Arp - Torso, 1958

Poetry and prose, however different in language, overlapped, almost coincided, in content. But modern poetry, if it ‘says’ anything at all, if it aspires to ‘mean’ as well as to ‘be,’ says what prose could not say in any fashion. To read the old poetry involved learning a slightly different language; to read the new involves the unmaking of your mind, the abandonment of all the logical and narrative connections which you use in reading prose or in conversation. You must achieve a trance-like condition in which images, associations, and sounds operate without these. Thus the common ground between poetry and any other use of words is reduced almost to zero. In that way poetry is now more quintessentially poetical than ever before; ‘purer’ in the negative sense. It not only does (like all good poetry) what prose can’t do: it deliberately refrains from doing anything that prose can do.
C. S. Lewis, from “Poetry,” in An Experiment in Criticism (Cambridge University Press, 1961)
blastedheath:

urgetocreate
William Nicholson (English, 1872-1949), Cliffs at Rottingdean, 1910. Oil on canvas, 33 x 41.5 cm. Southampton City Art Gallery. 
via

blastedheath:

urgetocreate

William Nicholson (English, 1872-1949), Cliffs at Rottingdean, 1910. Oil on canvas, 33 x 41.5 cm. Southampton City Art Gallery. 

via