clusters along the countertop


words+images in between


cabinhome:

breathe 3
the color green

theimpossiblecool:

Miles. 
complexae:

" Art of Being Amber " NYLON August 2000 Photographer: Mark BorthwickModel: Amber Valletta 

complexae:

" Art of Being Amber " 
NYLON August 2000 
Photographer: Mark Borthwick
Model: Amber Valletta 

europeansculpture:

Jean Arp - Torso, 1958

europeansculpture:

Jean Arp - Torso, 1958

Poetry and prose, however different in language, overlapped, almost coincided, in content. But modern poetry, if it ‘says’ anything at all, if it aspires to ‘mean’ as well as to ‘be,’ says what prose could not say in any fashion. To read the old poetry involved learning a slightly different language; to read the new involves the unmaking of your mind, the abandonment of all the logical and narrative connections which you use in reading prose or in conversation. You must achieve a trance-like condition in which images, associations, and sounds operate without these. Thus the common ground between poetry and any other use of words is reduced almost to zero. In that way poetry is now more quintessentially poetical than ever before; ‘purer’ in the negative sense. It not only does (like all good poetry) what prose can’t do: it deliberately refrains from doing anything that prose can do.
C. S. Lewis, from “Poetry,” in An Experiment in Criticism (Cambridge University Press, 1961)
blastedheath:

urgetocreate
William Nicholson (English, 1872-1949), Cliffs at Rottingdean, 1910. Oil on canvas, 33 x 41.5 cm. Southampton City Art Gallery. 
via

blastedheath:

urgetocreate

William Nicholson (English, 1872-1949), Cliffs at Rottingdean, 1910. Oil on canvas, 33 x 41.5 cm. Southampton City Art Gallery. 

via

alfiusdebux:

Brett Walker

alfiusdebux:

Brett Walker

(Source: inneroptics)

theparisreview:

The art collector George Costakis devoted his life “to unearthing masterworks of the Russian avant-garde … but his enthusiasm met with obstacles: the difficulty of tracking down the works, the neglect they had suffered, the disbelief of widows (‘What do you see in them?’). In a dacha outside Moscow he found a Constructivist masterpiece being used to close up a window; the owner wouldn’t part with it. He dashed to the city to fetch a piece of plywood the same size, ferried it back to the dacha, and swapped it for the painting.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

The art collector George Costakis devoted his life “to unearthing masterworks of the Russian avant-garde … but his enthusiasm met with obstacles: the difficulty of tracking down the works, the neglect they had suffered, the disbelief of widows (‘What do you see in them?’). In a dacha outside Moscow he found a Constructivist masterpiece being used to close up a window; the owner wouldn’t part with it. He dashed to the city to fetch a piece of plywood the same size, ferried it back to the dacha, and swapped it for the painting.”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

r0slyakova:

Fei Fei Sun | JIL SANDER FW 2014 (MFW)

r0slyakova:

Fei Fei Sun | JIL SANDER FW 2014 (MFW)